Destroying a Scammer’s Operation!

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So there’s a scammer out there claiming to sell medical mushrooms, except he’s really not because it’s kind of illegal. And b, I’ve gotten a message from someone who actually tried to buy some of these mushrooms and ended up getting scammed. So today, I’m going to scam this scammer and bring down his whole operation. And I’m gonna teach you how to do it too.

So I went ahead and I checked out the website and they’re trying to educate you on the benefits of using mushrooms to treat anxiety. There’s a lot of research and images which I’m guessing they just stole from somebody else’s website. Oh, there it is. They’re using images from the golden teacher, which is a Canadian based company promoting mushroom wellness. But they have to be real because there’s customer reviews from people like Robert D. and Blue R. and Sebastian S. who didn’t have much to say but he sure liked the mushrooms. Well, I look into a little bit more and they claim to be located in Alabama. But when I googled the address, it’s a little house in a rural part of town. I have my doubts and there’s a mushroom business operating here. So I do a public record search on the address and I find an old couple living there. I figure I’ll just call them up and see if they know anything about selling mushrooms.

“I can’t get to the phone right now. Just leave your number, name and I’ll call you back. Thanks.”   

I’m pretty sure they have no idea about any of this and the scammer just chose a random address so they can appear on Google. Now here’s the thing if you watch my videos, you’ll know that scammers will always try to find someone to impersonate and they might try to impersonate some of you. They’re gonna want to use your address or your email or your social security number. And if you’re not taking precautions, you might get mixed up in some shady business like this. If you think it can’t happen to you, you should know that American consumers lost 56 billion due to identity theft scams in 2020. That’s why I have to tell you about Aura, who is sponsoring this video. And I’m really excited about Aura because it’s identity theft protection, fraud monitoring, password management and anti virus software all combined into one easy to use App. What’s cool about Aura is that it monitors the dark web for your emails, passwords and social security numbers and sends you alerts fast right to your phone and email. And when it comes to fraud, every second matters, just connect your credit and bank accounts and get notified of any changes up to four times faster than any of its competitors. Plus their antivirus software will block malware and viruses before they infect your devices. So you’re getting all these awesome services in one easy to use app. So how about you just try it out for free for the next 14 days. Go find out if your personal identifiable information has been leaked to the dark web. It gave me a lot of peace of mind and I know it’ll do the same for you. You don’t want to put your family at risk. So use my link below to start your free trial today. 

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All right, so it’s time to reach out to see about buying some shrooms from whoever is running this site. So I fill out the contact page and I say my name is Ben Dover, and I said that I’m interested in pricing. And the next day I got an email from James L. Jones. Not to be confused with James Earl Jones, an American actor.

But he says: “Hi Ben, did anyone refer me to you?” 

Okay, so he’s already a little suspicious as he should be. But I said: “No, I did a search for psilocybin mushrooms near me.” And then he writes back and he just says: “Interesting”. Okay, what does that mean? Does he want my business or not? 

I say: “Where can I find some pricing info?” 

He says: “Here are the prices: $200 for an ounce, $350 for a quarter pound, $500 for a half pound and $900 for a pound. Let me know what quantity and type you after.” 

Okay. I honestly know absolutely nothing about mushrooms except that they taste pretty good sauteed on a steak. 

But I say: “I’ll start with a quarter pound.” 

He says: “Sounds good. How do you intend to pay? Zell, bank transfer, Amazon gift card, Cash App or Bitcoin?” 

And I guess he can’t just take a credit card or PayPal. Oh yeah, because this is illegal. 

So I say: “We can do the bank. Who do you bank with?” 

And he writes back with some banking info for a guy named Andres at Regions bank. And he says: “Let me know when it’s done.” 

All right. So if I’m talking to James, who is this Andres guy, he could be the accountant or he could be a money mule, who collects money for the scammer and then moves it overseas unless the scammer is domestic. I really have no idea. I just know that someone named Andres in the southeast is collecting the money for scam mushrooms. I just need a little bit more info to find out. 

So I say: “Phone number?” 

And he says: “Why? You just pay for your order and I ship. I only provide my number if you don’t receive package.”

I’m really starting to think that this is his money mule because he doesn’t want to hand over the phone number. And a lot of times these money mules don’t know that their money mules, a lot of times they are victims themselves collecting money for someone as a favor. And it takes a lot of time to find these mules and get them set up. So if I can warn this Andres guy or get his account flagged, I’ll slow this whole operation down. And that’s precisely why scammers will never let you talk to their mules. 

So I say: “Because my bank will want the phone number when I make payments. Are you Andres?” 

He says: “Yes, that is correct.” 

Wait, I thought this was James Earl Jones.

He says: “Don’t pay with the bank no more. Since I’ll need to buy some stuff from Amazon. Get me Amazon gift cards were $350. That’s $100 times 3 and $50 physical gift cards. Buy with cash so I can get a little commission when I redeem them. Keep the receipt because I’ll need that. I’ll tell you what to do next when you get them.” 

Who says stuffs? 

I say: “Okay, your email says James Jones, do you have a phone number? Might be easier to text.” 

(To be continue…)

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