Be Careful What You Open in Your Spam Folder! (Part 2)

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All right. So the President of the Royal Bank of Canada is going to hook me up with a lawyer who will get me my money from Janet Yellen who thinks I’m a terrorist or something. And it only cost me $6,900, which isn’t really that bad considering I’m about to get 12 million dollars. And I still don’t know why I’m getting 12 million dollars. But I write back and I say: “Okay, what do I have to do?” 

“Thank you for your email. You can contact this lawyer to help you get the requested documents, is the bank attorney. I will give your contact email to him, to contact you too. See below the contact” 

And he gives me the info for a law firm called August Law, which is an actual law firm but the contact email is @aol.com address. Wow. When was the last time you saw one of those?

So this person is impersonating an actual law firm. Let’s see how they perform. I write them and I say: “Hello, can you help me with my documents?” 

And then I soon get a message from Gary August, the lead attorney. You’ve got mail and he says: “Sir, your partner, David McKay from Royal Bank of Canada has come to my office and said that you need my service to get some documents at the United States Department of the Treasury which I’ve accepted. I have been to the office and your details are authentic.”

My details aren’t authentic? I made them up on the spot. 

He said: “Before I can carry out my legal obligations to you, I have some conditions to meet before that can be done. I have to get sworn affidavits from the Federal High Court. I will make a payment to the Inland Revenue Department and get a Clearance then a letter and the documents.” 

Then he tells me that I need to pay the $6,900 to get this carried out. Then he tells me to make the payment to a bank account below. He signs: “Barrister Gary August”. Except he forgot to include the bank information. So I say, I don’t see a bank account below. So he writes back with bank details and he wants me to send the money to a Bank of America account under the name Greenfield Logistics LLC.

Okay, why am I sending money to a company called Greenfield Logistics? Shouldn’t I send it to the law firm? If this was legit, I would but this is a scam and they’re just pretending to be a law firm. But Greenfield Logistics does have a bank account and when I look up a business, I can see that it was registered in the state of Georgia by someone named ***Omoraro, which appears to be a Nigerian name. 

So I eventually respond to the lawyer and I say: “Do you have a phone number for the person receiving the funds?” 

Hoping I can get the individual behind this bank account on the phone and they said: “This is the phone number ….”. And it looks to be an Internet number but I called anyway. And, no answer. I get an email later on and it says: “I am very sorry, my accountant said you call and he miss your call, please try and make the payment.” 

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And I’m like: “That’s ok. Can I try to call him again?”  

“Please make the payment and send the slip before you call him, have you paid.”

And I say: “No the bank wants me to call first and make sure I’m talking to the right person” 

“Then call now and he will talk with you?”

So I call again and I record it.

“Hello?”

“Hello” 

“Hello? Hello? Hello?”

“Hey, who’s this?”

“Ah, Mr.Good, how are you?”

“I’m fine. How are you?” 

“I’m ok, uh, why, why are you said you have been trying to call me? And the, uhh, it’s not going or they are not answering. Please uh, can you go and make the payment right? ”          

“Yeah, remind me who this is though. Is this Robin?”

“Uh, yes! That is why I said you should go and, go and make the payment, ok?”

“Wait, sir. Are you Robin? Are you Gary?”

“Yes! That is what I’m telling you. I’m the accountant to…uh…Barrister…August. That is, yeah, that is me. Go and send the money to the account, ok?”

“What’s your name again? I need to know who to put on the money transfer slip.”

“I have sent the information to you. Do you want me to resend it again?”

“I just need you to confirm it for me.”

“That is me. That is me. The information I gave to you…that is me, ok?”

“What is your name?”

“Uh, am I lying to you? You want to see the name, I’ll tell you the name. I’ve sent it to you several times.”

“I just want you to confirm it. Just tell me your name. My name is Ben. What’s your name?”

“I know your name is Ben Dover. Ok? I know your name. Ben Dover.”

“Nice to meet you. What’s your name?”

“My name is Ben! Robbin” 

“Your name is Ben?”

“Don’t you know my name?”

Why is it so freaking hard? Just tell me your name. 

“Lawyer…August”

“Your name is lawyer August?”

“No, no, no… The account I sent to you is Greenfield Logistics, ok?”

“Now I’m confused. I was told to send them. I was told to contact Gary.” 

“I am the accountant, yes, I am the accountant to Gary August”

“So, so you are the lawyer?” 

“I am the accountant to the lawyer! Ben August”

“Ben August?”

“Gary! Gary! Gary! Gary! Gary!???…Thank you”

“Ok”

“Ya welcome”

“Bye”

Well, that was weird. Anyway, after the call, he writes me and he says: “But my accountant said he has answered your call now, please you can go and make the payment now.”  So I sent him an email with a link that will track his IP address. Is he going to be in Georgia or is he going to be in Nigeria? Let’s find out. Nigeria. 

So the lawyer is in Nigeria but his accountant is apparently in Georgia funneling the money. What the heck is happening here? I’d better ask a cybersecurity threat advisor.

“So there’s a very good chance that this is going to be a money mule or someone that has opened the account in the name of another company. And what a lot of scammers will do is they will use different shell companies and several organizations, which are companies that are kind of like small and fake, that are just used to wire money back and forth. Um, logistics companies are a very popular way that scammers will use in order to wire money on that, on their behalf. And as well as things where that’s what this looks like. It looks like some type of money mule or some type of fake company that was set up to receive more money.” 

“So when I look up the registered business it looks like it’s registered to somebody with a Nigerian surname. Is it possible that the Nigerian scammers have boots on the ground people who are accomplices to their work here in the United States?” 

“Yep, that’s entirely possible. And one of the groups that does that is there are different confraternities that are located in Nigeria, that are responsible for a lot of this stuff. One of the groups we have is a weird track, known as IE, which is, which is one fraternity. Another fraternity that we track is also known as Black X. There was a really great BBC documentary that kind of talks about all of the fraud and all of the things that they’re responsible for. But when it comes to tracking the scammers, they’re one of the larger groups who’s responsible for doing a lot of this work. And when it comes to tracking stuff, Black X is one of the more difficult groups to track because a lot of the ways that they hide, they operate and other names they’d like to go under as well.”

So eventually he writes back and he says: “I am waiting? Please don’t waste my time. I have other things doing?” 

And I say: “Like what? What’s there to do in Nigeria right now?” 

Yeah, he didn’t write back after that, which means he knows that I’m smarter than him. But what are we going to do with this guy in Georgia?

“One of the best ways to report it is depending on where you are and what country you are. So if you’re located in the United States, the internet cybercrime and Complaint Center or IC3 is responsible for taking all of these complaints. So file a report with them, they can go ahead and take that information and take those metrics and use that to track. There is the public reporting agency for the FBI and they very much have that, um, the ability to kind of pass that stuff into internally. If you’re in the UK, I’m sure that the NCAA has lots of ability in order to track this up too. So find the best way to submit to them or whatever your local Federal organization and government is to pass information to.”

Well, everyone watch out for these mules and report them if you see them? And also watch out for other crazy things in your spam folder? What’s the craziest thing that you’ve ever seen? Let me know below in the comments. So be safe y’all and I will see you next time.

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